Geospatial information technology for emergency response


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Disaster management is generally understood to consist of four phases: mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. While these phases are all important and interrelated, response and recovery are often considered to be the most critical in terms of saving lives. Response is the acute phase occurring after the event, and includes all arrangemen. Search all titles. Geospatial information technology for emergency response Search all titles Search all collections. Your Account Logout.

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No matter what Hollywood thrillers like Geostorm suggest, we cannot use satellites to control natural disasters. What we can use satellites for, however, is to make informed decisions about disaster preparation, response, and recovery.

And as the last few hurricane seasons have proven, geospatial technologies are an indispensable tool for both short-term response and long-term rebuilding efforts.

Escorted by high-velocity winds, heavy rainfall and storm surge, hurricanes are one of the most destructive geophysical events. And when such a disaster strikes, everybody needs to come together and act as one in response efforts. Geospatial technologies kick into high gear right from the time a hurricane first begins its lifecycle.

GIS and remotely-sensed data are an important part of the pre-disaster strategy which includes developing multi-hazard models to predict the landfall point, wind speeds, rainfall distribution, etc.

Geospatial information is also essential to identify the precise locations of at-risk, critical infrastructure and transportation network, as well as the demographic profiles of vulnerable citizens.

For example, as the United States braced for Hurricane Florence earlier this month, GIS giant Esri released an interactive map to show the extent of probable storm-surge. This map was also packed with information like the median household income of those in the danger zone and the number of businesses, educational institutes, and health organizations that could be impacted. Further, the map shared how many people in the impact zone were above 65 years of age, giving federal agencies a clear indication of the level of preparation needed for the impending disaster.

Evacuation orders are also a product of GIS simulations, traffic and transportation data, flood mapping models, and the like, with exit routes being selected months in advance. Indays before Hurricane Matthew was set to make landfall in North Carolina, geospatial information technology for emergency response urged more than 1.

And this mass exodus could be executed with an enviable level of efficiency only because it was a geospatial information technology for emergency response of meticulous, information-driven planning. But, even with a high level of preparedness, determining the exact scale of devastation a natural disaster would wreak is never a certainty.

Which is why post-disaster response models often start with a map, and depend heavily on accurate real-time data. And when catastrophic Hurricane Harvey unleashed its fury on Texas inthe Federal Emergency Management Agency FEMA shared up-to-date geospatial data with all state and local emergency response providers on a daily basis. In fact, the identification of distribution centers is also dependent on spatially-aware data — where are the victims clustered, where is the nearest supply warehouse, how is the accessibility to the affected area, etc.

GIS is also required for visualizing the most efficient pickup points and evacuation routes for survivors, supplemented by essential information like the capacity of a shelter or which shelters can accommodate the special needs of the elderly.

When Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico inresponse and recovery officials were faced by a surprising challenge: there were no street addresses available for any of the rural areas. Even the majority of the houses have been built without permits on government or private land. And yet, within weeks, volunteers were able to analyze 1.

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The US Virgin Islands were also hit by Hurricane Maria, and that too only a few days after Hurricane Irma tore roofs off houses and shut down communication and power grids.

Here also aerial imagery and GIS played a central role in identifying and analyzing damaged roofs, allowing FEMA to accordingly prioritize its relief and recovery efforts. Utility providers have been leveraging geospatial technologies as a powerful recovery tool for years now. After Hurricane Sandy ravaged through the Northeast US inas many as 18 power companies across the country were keeping their customers updated through real-time outage maps. Many utilities had predictive maps up and running even before Sandy hit.

Indeed, when countless lives and billions of dollars in infrastructure are at stake, having access to accurate spatial data and GIS models can give officials and volunteers the confidence they need to make informed decisions and get started with their work before things become worse. Powered by Awesomeness. LOG IN. Log into your account.

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Geospatial Information Technology for Emergency Response Taylor & Francis Group

Remote Sensing. Map shows all possible impact zones of Hurricane Florence in real-time. Top 11 maps and charts that explain hurricanes. How Copernicus can support disaster management across the globe.

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  • Geospatial information technology for emergency response - Such models are mostly available from the design phase as CAD models. Design CAD models are in most of the cases too detailed for computing, for example evacuation routes.
  • Volume 4, Issue 2, April , Pages:
  • Imprint CRC Press.
  • Field Operating Guides for Responders.

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andreydd Geospatial Response provides clients with comprehensive services through all phases of preparedness planning, from risk assessments and mitigation, to technical plan writing and field guides. We combine scientific knowledge with operational experience to provide clients with comprehensive and exceptional support.
traffnabor Disaster management is generally understood to consist of four phases: mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. While these phases are all important and interrelated, response and recovery are often considered to be the most critical in terms of saving lives. Response is the acute phase occurring after the event, and includes all arrangemen. Search all titles.
slavikk The OGC provides a consensus process that communities of interest use to solve problems related to the creation, communication and use of spatial information. A community of interest might be those people who are interested in ocean observation, or those who are interested in 3D modeling of urban environments, or those who are interested in volunteered location information during disasters. These communities sort roughly into the ten domains below.
sony Biswajit Mukhopadhyay, Buddhadev Bhattacherjee. American Journal of Environmental Protection. Abstract: Disaster management being a key part of emergency management encompasses wide range activities.